Submission

Submission Preparation Checklist

Authors must check that their submission complies with all of the following things as part of the submission procedure, and entries that do not comply with these rules may be returned to the authors.

  • The submission has never been published before, and it is not currently being considered by another journal (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  • The document file format for the submission is Microsoft Word
  • Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  • The text is single-spaced; the font is 12-point; italics are used instead of underlining (except for URL addresses); and all images, figures, and tables are included in the text rather than at the conclusion.
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.

 

Journal Writing Guide LEVIOPUS 2022

Our template can be download HERE

The conditions for writing a journal manuscript are as follows:

1. The contents of the journal contain the results of research related to various fields of law. The scope of the law includes civil law, criminal law, civil procedural law, criminal procedural law, commercial law, constitutional law, international law, state administrative law, customary law, Islamic law, agrarian law, and environmental law.

2. Journal files are created in Microsoft Word format (.doc/.docx)

  1. Paper size: A4
  2. Margin : 3 cm (top, bottom, right, and left)
  3. Type: Times New Roman, 12 pt
  4. Spacing : 1.5

3. The title of the manuscript is written in Indonesian capital, a maximum of 14 words, Times New Roman font 12 pt, bold, and in the middle of the page. The title should be brief and reflect the important concepts of the manuscript.

4. Manuscripts consist of 13-30 pages (excluding abstracts and bibliography written in Indonesian or English.

5. Abstract written in English and Indonesian, Times New Roman size 12, justify, single spaced, consisting of 50-150 words in one paragraph, containing objectives, methods, and important results/findings/conclusions.

6. Abstract keywords consist of 3-5 words or phrases and must reflect the important concepts of the abstract and writing descriptions. Starting from the general and important. 

7. Journal writing is written in Indonesian with the General Guidelines for Indonesian Spelling (PUEBI) without containing elements of SARA, decency, and has never been published and is not the result of plagiarism of other people's work. If using a reference source, it is mandatory to write down the reference source (books, magazines, journals, or other citation sources).

8. Authors are advised to write the author's name and affiliation in the manuscript. The name used is the original name, not abbreviated or if it must be abbreviated, it is necessary to follow the applicable rules and be carried out consistently.

9. Manuscripts must use credible data and journals, and can refer to references to books, journals, laws and regulations, the internet, and other qualified references.

10. When referring to an article, the initial letter of the word “article” is written in capital letters.

11. When referring to a verse, the initial letter of the word “verse” is written in lowercase and the verse numbers are enclosed in brackets.

12. If in a direct quote of a phrase, paragraph, or article formulation a part is omitted, please indicate the omitted part with an ellipsis inserted in square brackets “[…]”.

13. The abbreviation of the names of laws and regulations is left to the style of each author, as long as they are used consistently. The suggested form, for example, is “Law no. 1 of 1950".

14. If there are more than 1 (one) author or editor of the referenced source, state the name of the first person followed by “et al.”.

15. The author is advised to avoid the enumerative method of elaboration.

16. Academic degrees are not listed in the bibliography or footnotes.

17. Writing citations using the Chicago Style citation style model for footnotes and bibliography. The guide link can be accessed at https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide/citation-guide-.html.

18. Authors are strongly encouraged to use citation management software, such as Mendeley, Zotero, and Endnote, to create footnotes and bibliography.

19. Writing laws and regulations, jurisprudence, and other primary legal materials, not using Chicago Style. Use the instructions given below.

20. Writing quotations and bibliographies, names, titles, publishers, names of institutions must continue to use the original language and official language without having to translate it from English into Indonesian or vice versa or from/to any language.

 

Citation guidelines

Footnotes are written in Calibri font with a size of 10 pt and a space of 1.

The order of the examples below is not the order of grouping the literature in the bibliography. The literature is simply sorted alphabetically without grouping.

A. Legislation

  1. Bibliography

The writing of the nomenclature of laws and regulations along with the number, year, and title can follow the example.

Example :

Law Number 20 of 2003 concerning the National Education System Regulation of the Minister of Finance Number 190/PMK.07/2021 concerning Village Fund Management

  1. Writing Legislation in Text

When the author mentions the rules for the first time, state the rules in full as in the Bibliography (can be in footnotes or in text) then write the abbreviations in brackets. Writing these abbreviations can be used for further mention. There is no provision regarding the provision of abbreviations as long as it remains clear and rational.

Example :

First mention: Law Number 1 of 1974 concerning Marriage (UUP)

The next mention: “…this is in line with the application of UUUP in various articles…”

B. Court Decision

  1. Bibliography

The writing of court forum product nomenclature, product number, subject, and legal starting date can follow the example.

Example :

Decision of the Supreme Court Number 55PK/Pid/1996 regarding the case review of Dr. Muchtar Pakpahan, S.H., M.A., October 25, 1996. Decision of the Constitutional Court Number 004/PUU-I/2003 concerning Judicial Review of the Law of the Republic of Indonesia Number 14 of 1985 concerning the Supreme Court against the 1945 Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia, December 30, 2003

  1. Writing Court Decisions in Text

When the author first mentions jurisprudence, mention the jurisprudence in full as in the Bibliography (can be in footnotes or in text) then write the abbreviations in brackets. Writing these abbreviations can be used for further mention. There is no provision regarding the provision of abbreviations as long as it remains clear and rational.

Example :

First use: Supreme Court Decision Number 55PK/Pid/1996 regarding the Judicial Review of the case of Dr. Muchtar Pakpahan, S.H., M.A., October 25, 1996 (MA 55PK/Pid/1996)

Subsequent usage: "... that's why the panel of judges at MA 55PK/Pid/1996 decided that way..."

C. Books

  1. Footnotes

<Writer's name>. <title>. (‹place of publication›: ‹publisher›, ‹year›), ‹page number›.

Examples: 

Zadie Smith, Swing Time (New York: Penguin Press, 2016), 315-316 Brian Grazer and Charles Fishman, A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015), 12.

  1. Bibliography

‹last name, author's first name›. <title>. ‹place of publication›: ‹publisher›, ‹year›.

Example :

Smith, Zadie. Swing Time. New York: Penguin Press, 2016.

Grazer, Brian, and Charles Fishman. A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015.

D. Journal Articles

  1. Footnotes

<Writer's name>. “‹title›”, ‹journal name› ‹volume›, ‹number› (‹month, year›): ‹page number›. ‹doi or url address›.

Example :

Roscoe Pound, “The Scope and Purpose of Sociological Jurisprudence”, Harvard Law Review 25, no. 6 (April 1912): 489-516.

Shao-Hsun Keng, Chun-Hung Lin, and Peter F. Orazem, “Expanding College Access in Taiwan, 1978–2014: Effects on Graduate Quality and Income Inequality,” Journal of Human Capital 11, no. 1 (Spring 2017): 9–10, https://doi.org/10.1086/690235.

  1. Bibliography

‹last name, author's first name›. “‹title›”,‹ journal name› ‹volume›, ‹number› (‹month, year›): ‹article page range›. ‹doi or url address›. 

Example :

Pound, Roscoe, “The Scope and Purpose of Sociological Jurisprudence”, Harvard Law Review 25, no. 6 (April 1912): 489-516.

Keng, Shao-Hsun, Chun-Hung Lin, and Peter F. Orazem. “Expanding College Access in Taiwan, 1978–2014: Effects on Graduate Quality and Income Inequality.” Journal of Human Capital 11, no. 1 (Spring 2017): 1–34. https://doi.org/10.1086/690235

E. Thesis/Dissertation

  1. Footnotes

<Writer's name>. “‹title›” (‹(thesis/dissertation)›, ‹institution›, ‹year›), ‹page number›.

Example :

Sudikno Mertokusumo, “History of the Judiciary and its Legislation in Indonesia Since 1942 and What Benefits it Has for Indonesia” (Doctoral Program Dissertation, Gadjah Mada University, 1971), 50.

Cynthia Lillian Rutz, “King Lear and Its Folktale Analogues” (PhD diss., University of Chicago, 2013), 99–100.

  1. Bibliography

‹last name, author's first name›. “‹title›”, ‹(thesis/dissertation)›, ‹institution, ‹year›.

Example :

Mertokusumo, Sudikno. "History of the Judiciary and its Legislation in Indonesia Since 1942 and What Are the Benefits for Indonesia", Doctoral Program Dissertation, Gadjah Mada University, 1971.

Rutz, Cynthia Lillian. “King Lear and Its Folktale Analogues”, PhD diss., University of Chicago, 2013.

F. Articles in Anthology with Editors

  1. Footnotes

<Writer's name>. “‹article title›” in ‹book title›, ed. ‹editor name›. (‹place of publication›: ‹publisher›, ‹year›), ‹page number)›.

Example :

Plato, "The Apology of Socrates," in The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces, ed. Mack Maynard (New York: Norton, 1985), 817. 

  1. Bibliography

‹Last name, first name of author›.“‹article title›” in ‹book title›, edited by ‹editor name›, ‹article page range›, ‹place of publication›: ‹publisher›, ‹year›.

Example :

Plato. "The Apology of Socrates." in The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces, edited by Mack Maynard, 816-838. New York: Norton, 1985.

G. Magazine or Newspaper Articles

  1. Footnotes

<Writer's name>. “‹article title›”, ‹magazine/newspaper name›, ‹publish date›, ‹URL address›, ‹page number›.

Example :

Falaakh, Mohammad Fajrul, “Inconstitutional Yogya Monarchy?”, Kompas, 1 December 2010, 21.

Farhad Manjoo, “Snap Makes a Bet on the Cultural Supremacy of the Camera,” New York Times, March 8, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html.  

  1. Bibliography

‹last name, author's first name›. “‹article title›”, ‹magazine/newspaper name›, ‹publish date›, ‹URL address›.

Example :

Falaakh, Mohammad Fajrul, “Inconstitutional Yogya Monarchy?”, Kompas, 1 December 2010.

Manjoo, Farhad. “Snap Makes a Bet on the Cultural Supremacy of the  Camera.” New York Times, 8 March 2017.  https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html.  

H. Internet

  1. Footnotes

‹name of author/website owner›. “‹article title›”, ‹url address› (accessed ‹access date›).

Example :

Indonesian Child Protection Commission, "52 State Commissions, KPAI Determined by Natural Selection", http://www.kpai.go.id/publikasi-mainmenu-33/29-52- komisi-negara-kpaiditentukan-seleksi-alam-.html, accessed March 12, 2022. John Smith. "Obama inaugurated as President." CNN.com. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/01/21/obama_inaugurated/index.html (accessed February 1, 2009).

  1. Bibliography

‹last name, first name of author/website owner›, “‹article title›”. ‹url address› (accessed ‹access date›).

Example :

Indonesian Child Protection Commission, "52 State Commissions, KPAI Determined by Natural Selection". http://www.kpai.go.id/publikasi-mainmenu-33/29-52- komisi-negara-kpai-ditentukan-seleksi-alam-.html  (accessed January 15, 2011).

Smith, John. "Obama inaugurated as President." CNN.com. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/01/21/obama_inaugurated/index.html (accessed February 1, 2009).